A portion of the aft section of the docked space shuttle Discovery (STS-131), Mexico, Baja California, and the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 23 crew member on the International Space Station.
(link)

A portion of the aft section of the docked space shuttle Discovery (STS-131), Mexico, Baja California, and the Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 23 crew member on the International Space Station.

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The International Space Station (center) appears very small from the point of view of the space shuttle Atlantis as the two spacecraft carry out their relative separation. Atlantis’ vertical stabilizer, orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods, remote manipulator system/orbiter boom sensor system (RMS/OBSS) and payload bay are also pictured in this image photographed by an STS-132 crew member onboard the shuttle. Earlier the STS-132 and Expedition 23 crews concluded seven days of cooperative work onboard the shuttle and station. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 10:22 a.m. (CDT) on May 23, 2010.
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The International Space Station (center) appears very small from the point of view of the space shuttle Atlantis as the two spacecraft carry out their relative separation. Atlantis’ vertical stabilizer, orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods, remote manipulator system/orbiter boom sensor system (RMS/OBSS) and payload bay are also pictured in this image photographed by an STS-132 crew member onboard the shuttle. Earlier the STS-132 and Expedition 23 crews concluded seven days of cooperative work onboard the shuttle and station. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 10:22 a.m. (CDT) on May 23, 2010.

(link)


Photographed from a shuttle training aircraft, space shuttle Endeavour and its six-member STS-134 crew head toward Earth orbit and rendezvous with the International Space Station. Liftoff was at 8:56 a.m. (EDT) on May 16, 2011, from Launch Pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. Onboard are NASA astronauts Mark Kelly, commander; Greg H. Johnson, pilot; Michael Fincke, Andrew Feustel, Greg Chamitoff and European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori, all mission specialists. STS-134 will deliver the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS), Express Logistics Carrier-3, a high-pressure gas tank and additional spare parts for the Dextre robotic helper to the International Space Station. STS-134 is the final spaceflight for Endeavour.
(link)

Photographed from a shuttle training aircraft, space shuttle Endeavour and its six-member STS-134 crew head toward Earth orbit and rendezvous with the International Space Station. Liftoff was at 8:56 a.m. (EDT) on May 16, 2011, from Launch Pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. Onboard are NASA astronauts Mark Kelly, commander; Greg H. Johnson, pilot; Michael Fincke, Andrew Feustel, Greg Chamitoff and European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori, all mission specialists. STS-134 will deliver the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS), Express Logistics Carrier-3, a high-pressure gas tank and additional spare parts for the Dextre robotic helper to the International Space Station. STS-134 is the final spaceflight for Endeavour.

(link)

for-all-mankind:

Interesting perspectives on STS-2 during the final phases of stacking in the Vehicle Assembly Building, 1981.


The space shuttle Atlantis is pictured over clouds prior to a perfect docking with the International Space Station at 10:07 a.m. (CDT).
(link)

The space shuttle Atlantis is pictured over clouds prior to a perfect docking with the International Space Station at 10:07 a.m. (CDT).

(link)


One of the members of the joint crews for STS-135 and International Space Station Expedition 28 exposed this image of Atlantis and its Orbital Boom Sensor System robot arm extension backdropped against Earth’s horizon and a greenish phenomenon associated with Aurora Australis. One of the station’s solar array panels appears at upper left. Because of exposure time needed for this type photographny, some of the stars in the background are blurred.
(link)

One of the members of the joint crews for STS-135 and International Space Station Expedition 28 exposed this image of Atlantis and its Orbital Boom Sensor System robot arm extension backdropped against Earth’s horizon and a greenish phenomenon associated with Aurora Australis. One of the station’s solar array panels appears at upper left. Because of exposure time needed for this type photographny, some of the stars in the background are blurred.

(link)


The space shuttle Endeavour is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 22 crew member on the International Space Station soon after the shuttle and station began their post-undocking relative separation. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 7:54 p.m. (EST) on Feb. 19, 2010. Also pictured are the newly-installed Tranquility node and Cupola; along with a Russian Soyuz spacecraft docked with the station. Earth’s horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.
(link)

The space shuttle Endeavour is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 22 crew member on the International Space Station soon after the shuttle and station began their post-undocking relative separation. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 7:54 p.m. (EST) on Feb. 19, 2010. Also pictured are the newly-installed Tranquility node and Cupola; along with a Russian Soyuz spacecraft docked with the station. Earth’s horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

(link)

fuckyeahspaceshuttle:

Ready to Fly

On Launch Pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Discovery awaits liftoff on its final mission as the Final Inspection Team members complete their examination of the vehicle.
(link)

fuckyeahspaceshuttle:

Ready to Fly

On Launch Pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Discovery awaits liftoff on its final mission as the Final Inspection Team members complete their examination of the vehicle.

(link)

Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off for STS-124, 31 May 2008

Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off for STS-124, 31 May 2008

Pegasus, the barge containing ET-119, is towed towards Port Canaveral. This external tank will be used on STS-121.

Pegasus, the barge containing ET-119, is towed towards Port Canaveral. This external tank will be used on STS-121.

The jettisoned external tank photographed from Space Shuttle Discovery during the ascent of STS-124, 31 May 2008.

The jettisoned external tank photographed from Space Shuttle Discovery during the ascent of STS-124, 31 May 2008.

for-all-mankind:

Remembering Wubbo Ockels, who died earlier today, 18 May 2014, in the Netherlands. Ockels was the first Dutch citizen in space, flying on the joint NASA-ESA mission STS 61-A in 1985. During the weeklong mission, a variety of scientific experiments were carried out in Europe’s Spacelab module, which was carried in the payload bay of the orbiter.
Ockels is seen here, second from right, with the eight member crew of STS-61-A in a publicity photo prior to launch.
The mission, lasting from 30 October to 6 November 1985, was also the last successful flight of Challenger.

for-all-mankind:

Remembering Wubbo Ockels, who died earlier today, 18 May 2014, in the Netherlands. Ockels was the first Dutch citizen in space, flying on the joint NASA-ESA mission STS 61-A in 1985. During the weeklong mission, a variety of scientific experiments were carried out in Europe’s Spacelab module, which was carried in the payload bay of the orbiter.

Ockels is seen here, second from right, with the eight member crew of STS-61-A in a publicity photo prior to launch.

The mission, lasting from 30 October to 6 November 1985, was also the last successful flight of Challenger.