STS-124 launch from inside the flight deck, 31 May 2008

Launch of STS-124, five years ago today

for-all-mankind:

Space shuttle Atlantis is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 23 crew member on the International Space Station soon after the shuttle and station began their post-undocking relative separation. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 10:22 a.m. (CDT) on May 23, 2010, ending a seven-day stay that saw the addition of a new station module, replacement of batteries and resupply of the orbiting outpost.

for-all-mankind:

Space shuttle Atlantis is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 23 crew member on the International Space Station soon after the shuttle and station began their post-undocking relative separation. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 10:22 a.m. (CDT) on May 23, 2010, ending a seven-day stay that saw the addition of a new station module, replacement of batteries and resupply of the orbiting outpost.


The Flight Deck of Space Shuttle Endeavour  
  Image Credit & Copyright:  Ben Cooper (Launch Photography), Spaceflight Now

The Flight Deck of Space Shuttle Endeavour


Image Credit & Copyright: Ben Cooper (Launch Photography), Spaceflight Now

(via understandingtheuniverse)

for-all-mankind:

Shuttle Enterprise arrives at the Marshall Space Flight Center for the Mated Vertical Ground Vibration Test (MVGVT) series in Huntsville, Alabama, 1 March, 1978. The test series began at the Dynamic Test Stand in 1978 with the other components of the Space Transportation System.  Booster configuration tests, involving the orbiter Enterprise and the External Tank, began in May and were completed in July. Here, the orbiter passes MSFC Building 4200 on its way to the test area.

Way back when it was all ahead of us…. I look forward to when someone says the same thing about today’s commercial spaceflight industry.

for-all-mankind:

Shuttle Enterprise arrives at the Marshall Space Flight Center for the Mated Vertical Ground Vibration Test (MVGVT) series in Huntsville, Alabama, 1 March, 1978. The test series began at the Dynamic Test Stand in 1978 with the other components of the Space Transportation System.  Booster configuration tests, involving the orbiter Enterprise and the External Tank, began in May and were completed in July. Here, the orbiter passes MSFC Building 4200 on its way to the test area.

Way back when it was all ahead of us…. I look forward to when someone says the same thing about today’s commercial spaceflight industry.

for-all-mankind:

Via Spaceflight now: The clamshell payload bay doors of space shuttle Atlantis swung open this week at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex as the retired ship is configured to mimic her flying days in orbit. 

for-all-mankind:

Via Spaceflight now: The clamshell payload bay doors of space shuttle Atlantis swung open this week at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex as the retired ship is configured to mimic her flying days in orbit. 

fuckyeahfemaleastronauts:

Wendy Lawrence underneath the heat tiles of the Atlantis. Space shuttle Atlantis will be on display in the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex from this summer onwards. (x)

fuckyeahfemaleastronauts:

Wendy Lawrence underneath the heat tiles of the Atlantis. Space shuttle Atlantis will be on display in the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex from this summer onwards. (x)

(via understandingtheuniverse)

fuckyeahspaceshuttle:

First Shuttle Launch

A new era in space flight began on April 12, 1981, when Space Shuttle Columbia, or STS-1, soared into orbit from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. 
Astronaut John Young, a veteran of four previous spaceflights including a walk on the moon in 1972, commanded the mission. Navy test pilot Bob Crippen piloted the mission and would go on to command three future shuttle missions. The shuttle was humankind’s first re-usable spacecraft. The orbiter would launch like a rocket and land like a plane. The two solid rocket boosters that helped push them into space would also be re-used, after being recovered in the ocean. Only the massive external fuel tank would burn up as it fell back to Earth. It was all known as the Space Transportation System.
Twenty years prior to the historic launch, on April 12, 1961, the era of human spaceflight began when Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first human to orbit the Earth in his Vostock I spacecraft. The flight lasted 108 minutes. 
Pictured here: a timed exposure of STS-1, at Launch Pad A, Complex 39, turns the space vehicle and support facilities into a night- time fantasy of light. Structures to the left of the shuttle are the fixed and the rotating service structure. 

(via NASA - Image of the Day)

fuckyeahspaceshuttle:

First Shuttle Launch

A new era in space flight began on April 12, 1981, when Space Shuttle Columbia, or STS-1, soared into orbit from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. 

Astronaut John Young, a veteran of four previous spaceflights including a walk on the moon in 1972, commanded the mission. Navy test pilot Bob Crippen piloted the mission and would go on to command three future shuttle missions. The shuttle was humankind’s first re-usable spacecraft. The orbiter would launch like a rocket and land like a plane. The two solid rocket boosters that helped push them into space would also be re-used, after being recovered in the ocean. Only the massive external fuel tank would burn up as it fell back to Earth. It was all known as the Space Transportation System.

Twenty years prior to the historic launch, on April 12, 1961, the era of human spaceflight began when Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first human to orbit the Earth in his Vostock I spacecraft. The flight lasted 108 minutes. 

Pictured here: a timed exposure of STS-1, at Launch Pad A, Complex 39, turns the space vehicle and support facilities into a night- time fantasy of light. Structures to the left of the shuttle are the fixed and the rotating service structure. 

(via NASA - Image of the Day)

Custom M&Ms served onboard STS-135, the final space shuttle mission.

Custom M&Ms served onboard STS-135, the final space shuttle mission.

for-all-mankind:

The liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen tanks for the Space Shuttle’s external tank being assembled in the weld assembly area of the Michoud Assembly Facility, near New Orleans, Louisiana.

for-all-mankind:

The liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen tanks for the Space Shuttle’s external tank being assembled in the weld assembly area of the Michoud Assembly Facility, near New Orleans, Louisiana.

31262:

Enterprise at Vandenberg’s SLC-6

31262:

Enterprise at Vandenberg’s SLC-6

(via shuttleisland)