for-all-mankind:

The Orbital Science Cygnus resupply ship Janice Voss approaches the International Space Station, Wednesday, 16 July, 2014.


The International Space Station (center) appears very small from the point of view of the space shuttle Atlantis as the two spacecraft carry out their relative separation. Atlantis’ vertical stabilizer, orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods, remote manipulator system/orbiter boom sensor system (RMS/OBSS) and payload bay are also pictured in this image photographed by an STS-132 crew member onboard the shuttle. Earlier the STS-132 and Expedition 23 crews concluded seven days of cooperative work onboard the shuttle and station. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 10:22 a.m. (CDT) on May 23, 2010.
(link)

The International Space Station (center) appears very small from the point of view of the space shuttle Atlantis as the two spacecraft carry out their relative separation. Atlantis’ vertical stabilizer, orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods, remote manipulator system/orbiter boom sensor system (RMS/OBSS) and payload bay are also pictured in this image photographed by an STS-132 crew member onboard the shuttle. Earlier the STS-132 and Expedition 23 crews concluded seven days of cooperative work onboard the shuttle and station. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 10:22 a.m. (CDT) on May 23, 2010.

(link)


One of the members of the joint crews for STS-135 and International Space Station Expedition 28 exposed this image of Atlantis and its Orbital Boom Sensor System robot arm extension backdropped against Earth’s horizon and a greenish phenomenon associated with Aurora Australis. One of the station’s solar array panels appears at upper left. Because of exposure time needed for this type photographny, some of the stars in the background are blurred.
(link)

One of the members of the joint crews for STS-135 and International Space Station Expedition 28 exposed this image of Atlantis and its Orbital Boom Sensor System robot arm extension backdropped against Earth’s horizon and a greenish phenomenon associated with Aurora Australis. One of the station’s solar array panels appears at upper left. Because of exposure time needed for this type photographny, some of the stars in the background are blurred.

(link)


The space shuttle Endeavour is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 22 crew member on the International Space Station soon after the shuttle and station began their post-undocking relative separation. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 7:54 p.m. (EST) on Feb. 19, 2010. Also pictured are the newly-installed Tranquility node and Cupola; along with a Russian Soyuz spacecraft docked with the station. Earth’s horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.
(link)

The space shuttle Endeavour is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 22 crew member on the International Space Station soon after the shuttle and station began their post-undocking relative separation. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred at 7:54 p.m. (EST) on Feb. 19, 2010. Also pictured are the newly-installed Tranquility node and Cupola; along with a Russian Soyuz spacecraft docked with the station. Earth’s horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

(link)

humanoidhistory:

April 29, 2001 — The International Space Station shows off its new space grabber Canadarm2, photographed from the Space Shuttle Endeavour following separation as shuttle mission STS-100 draws to a close. (NASA)

It’s so little! So used to seeing the fully-formed ISS, these really are baby pictures!

humanoidhistory:

April 29, 2001 — The International Space Station shows off its new space grabber Canadarm2, photographed from the Space Shuttle Endeavour following separation as shuttle mission STS-100 draws to a close. (NASA)

It’s so little! So used to seeing the fully-formed ISS, these really are baby pictures!

(via n-a-s-a)

A message for the World Cup from the International Space Station residents. And a bit of Zero-G football, which I’ve wanted to watch ever since it was discussed in Red Dwarf a quarter of a century ago.

canadian-space-agency:

JAXA Astronaut Koichi Wakata enjoying the magnificent view of Earth inside the cupola of the International Space Station on April 27th 2014.
Credit: JAXA Astronaut Koichi Wakata

canadian-space-agency:

JAXA Astronaut Koichi Wakata enjoying the magnificent view of Earth inside the cupola of the International Space Station on April 27th 2014.

Credit: JAXA Astronaut Koichi Wakata

The crew of STS-124 pose for a photograph inside Kibō, the module delivered and installed on the ISS on this mission. STS-124 began with Space Shuttle Discovery’s launch on 31 May 2008.
Top row: Mark Kelly (Commander), Aki Hoshide, Ron Garan (Mission Specialists). Bottom row: Ken Ham (Pilot), Karen Nyberg, Mike Fossum (Mission Specialists). Not shown are Mission Specialists Greg Chamitoff, who launched with STS-124 for a long-term stay on the ISS, and Garret Reisman, who returned to Earth from his long-stay ISS mission with the STS-124 crew.

The crew of STS-124 pose for a photograph inside Kibō, the module delivered and installed on the ISS on this mission. STS-124 began with Space Shuttle Discovery’s launch on 31 May 2008.

Top row: Mark Kelly (Commander), Aki Hoshide, Ron Garan (Mission Specialists). Bottom row: Ken Ham (Pilot), Karen Nyberg, Mike Fossum (Mission Specialists). Not shown are Mission Specialists Greg Chamitoff, who launched with STS-124 for a long-term stay on the ISS, and Garret Reisman, who returned to Earth from his long-stay ISS mission with the STS-124 crew.

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How do you vacuum in space?

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What happens to your body in space? 

canadian-space-agency:

This picture of the Sochi Olympic Park at night was taken by a crew member aboard the International Space Station. The Fisht Stadium and the olympic flame are visible.
Image credit: NASA

canadian-space-agency:

This picture of the Sochi Olympic Park at night was taken by a crew member aboard the International Space Station. The Fisht Stadium and the olympic flame are visible.

Image credit: NASA

canadian-space-agency:

International Space Station Assembly

Annotated animation detailing the assembly of the International Space Station, from the launch of the first segment in 1998 to today and beyond.

Credit: ReelNASA