Oleg Kotov practising contingency manual docking procedures onboard the ISS, 22 November 2013, in preparation for the arrival of the next Progress cargo spacecraft, should they be needed.  The Progress docked on 29 November, however a failure in the automated docking process meant Kotov was required to perform a manual docking. 

Oleg Kotov practising contingency manual docking procedures onboard the ISS, 22 November 2013, in preparation for the arrival of the next Progress cargo spacecraft, should they be needed.  The Progress docked on 29 November, however a failure in the automated docking process meant Kotov was required to perform a manual docking. 

fyeahcosmonauts:

Gennady Padalka and Oleg Kononenko have their birthday today (June 21). Last year they both celebrated it on the ISS. Padalka is in fourth place for most amount of time in space at 710 days and 6 hours. He has had a mission on Mir and three missions on the ISS. Kononenko started his career as an engineer before becoming a cosmonaut and making two flights aboard the ISS in 2008 and 2011-2. 

(Source: 1 & 2)

fyeahcosmonauts:

It’s Aleksandr Volkov’s birthday today. He has visited the space stations Salyut 7 in 1985 and Mir in 1988-9 and 1991-2. His is also the father of the first second-generation cosmonaut, Sergei Volkov. 

(GCTC)

OMG he so totally looks like his son

Yuri Gagarin and Alexei Leonov at a fancy dress party, Star City, 1965

Yuri Gagarin and Alexei Leonov at a fancy dress party, Star City, 1965

Vladimir Titov and Samantha Cristoforetti, Star City, Russia, 9 April 2013.

Vladimir Titov and Samantha Cristoforetti, Star City, Russia, 9 April 2013.

STS-60, the first mission of the Shuttle-Mir program, included Sergei Krikalev, the first Russian cosmonaut to fly onboard a space shuttle. 

STS-60, the first mission of the Shuttle-Mir program, included Sergei Krikalev, the first Russian cosmonaut to fly onboard a space shuttle. 

colchrishadfield:

Successful Docking! Oleg and Roman celebrate the arrival of Progress 50 spaceship.

colchrishadfield:

Successful Docking! Oleg and Roman celebrate the arrival of Progress 50 spaceship.

(via fyeahcosmonauts)

fyeahcosmonauts:

The backup crew, Viktor Gorbatko and Eberhard Köllner, and prime crew Valery Bykovsky and Sigmund Jähn, of Soyuz 31. The Russian and East German crew spent 7 days in space aboard Salyut 6 as part of the Interkosmos program. (1978)
(Source)

fyeahcosmonauts:

The backup crew, Viktor Gorbatko and Eberhard Köllner, and prime crew Valery Bykovsky and Sigmund Jähn, of Soyuz 31. The Russian and East German crew spent 7 days in space aboard Salyut 6 as part of the Interkosmos program. (1978)

(Source)

fyeahcosmonauts:

Yelena Serova and the rest of her crew, Aleksandr Samokutyayev and Barry Wilmore, had their turn at winter survival training. Serova even got to pretend to have a broken leg. She becomes the fourth Russian woman in space next year in September.

(Source: 1 & 2)

Is the role of Crewmember With Fake Broken Leg always given to the woman?  It was Samantha Cristoforetti’s role in her winter survival training.

heysawbones:

Valentina Vladimirovna Tereshkova (Russian: Валенти́на Влади́мировна Терешко́ва; born 6 March 1937) is a retired Soviet cosmonaut and the first woman to have flown in space, having been selected from more than four hundred applicants and five finalists to pilot Vostok 6 on 16 June 1963.


Before being recruited as a cosmonaut, Tereshkova was a textile factory assembly worker and an amateur parachutist. After the dissolution of the first group of female cosmonauts in 1969, she became a prominent member of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, holding various political offices. She remained politically active following the collapse of the Soviet Union and is still revered as a heroine in post-Soviet Russia.

… 

Valentina Tereshkova later became a prominent member of the Soviet government and a well known representative abroad. She was made a member of the World Peace Council in 1966, a member of the Yaroslavl Soviet in 1967, a member of the Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union in 1966–1970 and 1970–1974, and was elected to the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet in 1974. She was also the Soviet representative to the UN Conference for the International Women’s Year in Mexico City in 1975. She also led the Soviet delegation to the World Conference on Women in Copenhagen and played a critical role in shaping the socialist women’s global agenda for peace. She attained the rank of deputy to the Supreme Soviet, membership of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union Central Committee, Vice President of the International Woman’s Democratic Federation and President of the Soviet-Algerian Friendship Society. She was decorated with the Hero of the Soviet Union medal, the USSR’s highest award. She was also awarded the Order of Lenin, Order of the October Revolution, numerous other medals, and foreign orders including the Karl Marx Order, United Nations Gold Medal of Peace and the Simba International Women’s Movement Award. She was also bestowed a title of the Hero of Socialist Labor of Czechoslovakia, Hero of Labor of Vietnam, and Hero of Mongolia. In 1990 she received an honorary doctorate from the University of Edinburgh. Tereshkova crater on the far side of the Moon was named after her. 
Valentina Tereshkova became the first and still remains to be the only female general officer in both Soviet and Russian armed forces.
A full list of Tereshkova’s insane number of awards and medals can be found here.

(via womeninspace)

colchrishadfield:


A pre-launch photo of the crew. Morale is important - laughing together is essential to real success.

colchrishadfield:

A pre-launch photo of the crew. Morale is important - laughing together is essential to real success.

(via fyeahcosmonauts)