archivesfoundation:

Happy birthday, John Glenn! Born on July 18, 1921, he was a U.S. Marine who served in both World War II and the Korean War. In 1959, he was chosen as one of the original group of seven astronauts for NASA’s Project Mercury, and then on February 20, 1962, he became the first American to orbit Earth, as well as the fifth human in space.
After many years in the military and at NASA, Glenn served as a US Senator from Ohio for 24 years. In 1998, at the age of 77, Glenn returned to space to study the effects of space flight on the elderly.
Image: “Photograph of Astronaut John H. Glenn, Jr. in His Mark IV Pressure Suit, 01/23/1962”

archivesfoundation:

Happy birthday, John Glenn! Born on July 18, 1921, he was a U.S. Marine who served in both World War II and the Korean War. In 1959, he was chosen as one of the original group of seven astronauts for NASA’s Project Mercury, and then on February 20, 1962, he became the first American to orbit Earth, as well as the fifth human in space.

After many years in the military and at NASA, Glenn served as a US Senator from Ohio for 24 years. In 1998, at the age of 77, Glenn returned to space to study the effects of space flight on the elderly.

Image: “Photograph of Astronaut John H. Glenn, Jr. in His Mark IV Pressure Suit, 01/23/1962

(via lightthiscandle)

colchrishadfield:

45 years ago today these three men inspired the world with their bravery, skill and example; Thanks Mike, Buzz and Neil.

colchrishadfield:

45 years ago today these three men inspired the world with their bravery, skill and example; Thanks Mike, Buzz and Neil.

lightthiscandle:


(April 1970)—-Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan (right), backup crew commander of the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission, pours a scoop-full of sample material into a bag held by astronaut Joe H. Engle, Apollo 14 backup crew lunar module pilot. The two joined the prime crew members and other Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) personnel on a training trip to various areas of Hawaii. Here in Kapoho, the two backup crew members for NASA’s next lunar landing mission are taking part in a full simulation of a traverse on the lunar surface. Note the check-list on Cernan’s left wrist. He carries a penetrometer in his belt. The terrain in this area bears many similarities to that on the lunar surface. (Photo credit: NASA)

Why, hello.

lightthiscandle:

(April 1970)—-Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan (right), backup crew commander of the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission, pours a scoop-full of sample material into a bag held by astronaut Joe H. Engle, Apollo 14 backup crew lunar module pilot. The two joined the prime crew members and other Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) personnel on a training trip to various areas of Hawaii. Here in Kapoho, the two backup crew members for NASA’s next lunar landing mission are taking part in a full simulation of a traverse on the lunar surface. Note the check-list on Cernan’s left wrist. He carries a penetrometer in his belt. The terrain in this area bears many similarities to that on the lunar surface. (Photo credit: NASA)

Why, hello.

womeninspace:

Crewmates Samantha Cristoforetti and Anton Shkaplerov together during the roll out of Soyuz TMA-13M.
Source: Samantha Cristoforetti

womeninspace:

Crewmates Samantha Cristoforetti and Anton Shkaplerov together during the roll out of Soyuz TMA-13M.

Source: Samantha Cristoforetti

The crew of STS-124 pose for a photograph inside Kibō, the module delivered and installed on the ISS on this mission. STS-124 began with Space Shuttle Discovery’s launch on 31 May 2008.
Top row: Mark Kelly (Commander), Aki Hoshide, Ron Garan (Mission Specialists). Bottom row: Ken Ham (Pilot), Karen Nyberg, Mike Fossum (Mission Specialists). Not shown are Mission Specialists Greg Chamitoff, who launched with STS-124 for a long-term stay on the ISS, and Garret Reisman, who returned to Earth from his long-stay ISS mission with the STS-124 crew.

The crew of STS-124 pose for a photograph inside Kibō, the module delivered and installed on the ISS on this mission. STS-124 began with Space Shuttle Discovery’s launch on 31 May 2008.

Top row: Mark Kelly (Commander), Aki Hoshide, Ron Garan (Mission Specialists). Bottom row: Ken Ham (Pilot), Karen Nyberg, Mike Fossum (Mission Specialists). Not shown are Mission Specialists Greg Chamitoff, who launched with STS-124 for a long-term stay on the ISS, and Garret Reisman, who returned to Earth from his long-stay ISS mission with the STS-124 crew.

womeninspace:

Jeanette Epps gets suited up with help from Koichi Wakata for an EVA preparation session. Often a spacewalk is practiced on the ground first, to foresee problems for the astronauts up in space.
Source: NASA ISS imagery

womeninspace:

Jeanette Epps gets suited up with help from Koichi Wakata for an EVA preparation session. Often a spacewalk is practiced on the ground first, to foresee problems for the astronauts up in space.

Source: NASA ISS imagery

From Reid Wiseman (@astro_reid): “Take note @Astro_Alex - you gotta do the next one!! Please be kind my friend”

From Reid Wiseman (@astro_reid): “Take note @Astro_Alex - you gotta do the next one!! Please be kind my friend”

From @AstroSamantha: DON’T PANIC and always know where your towel is. From #Exp42: Happy #towelday 

From @AstroSamantha: DON’T PANIC and always know where your towel is. From #Exp42: Happy #towelday 

womeninspace:

Samantha Cristoforetti during an Orlan training.
Source: Samantha Cristoforetti on Flickr

womeninspace:

Samantha Cristoforetti during an Orlan training.

Source: Samantha Cristoforetti on Flickr

for-all-mankind:

Remembering Wubbo Ockels, who died earlier today, 18 May 2014, in the Netherlands. Ockels was the first Dutch citizen in space, flying on the joint NASA-ESA mission STS 61-A in 1985. During the weeklong mission, a variety of scientific experiments were carried out in Europe’s Spacelab module, which was carried in the payload bay of the orbiter.
Ockels is seen here, second from right, with the eight member crew of STS-61-A in a publicity photo prior to launch.
The mission, lasting from 30 October to 6 November 1985, was also the last successful flight of Challenger.

for-all-mankind:

Remembering Wubbo Ockels, who died earlier today, 18 May 2014, in the Netherlands. Ockels was the first Dutch citizen in space, flying on the joint NASA-ESA mission STS 61-A in 1985. During the weeklong mission, a variety of scientific experiments were carried out in Europe’s Spacelab module, which was carried in the payload bay of the orbiter.

Ockels is seen here, second from right, with the eight member crew of STS-61-A in a publicity photo prior to launch.

The mission, lasting from 30 October to 6 November 1985, was also the last successful flight of Challenger.

Samantha Cristoforetti, member of the backup crew of TMA-13M, lays carnations at Gagarin’s tomb, Moscow, 14 May 2014 (via @AstroSamantha)

Samantha Cristoforetti, member of the backup crew of TMA-13M, lays carnations at Gagarin’s tomb, Moscow, 14 May 2014 (via @AstroSamantha)

womeninspace:

Have you all seen the new ESA astronaut website? It has been renewed and you can now find all the updates from your favorite ESA astronauts in one place, such as, for example, from Samantha Cristoforetti.
Go check it out at astronauts.esa.int!

womeninspace:

Have you all seen the new ESA astronaut website? It has been renewed and you can now find all the updates from your favorite ESA astronauts in one place, such as, for example, from Samantha Cristoforetti.

Go check it out at astronauts.esa.int!